Mar 232015
 

The regular late winter/early spring showers are back for a few days, but the weather overall continues to be very mild for this time of year. You won’t hear this very often from someone who lives in the PacNW in March, but we could use the rain. The water levels of rivers and lakes around here are very low and there isn’t much of a snowpack this year. As of today, we only have 7% of our usual average snowpack. That is not good news because water has to come from somewhere, and around here, when it’s not raining, it comes from melted snow.

Anyway, the mild late winter weather is making us think that it’s going to be an early start to the fishing season, so we are starting to get the fishing gear ready to go. A good way to spend a rainy day indoors is to clean up all those fishing reels. I’m not a believer in expensive fishing gear, I try to get good fishing tackle at a reasonable price. The thing with less expensive fishing reels is that you have to do regular maintenance on them to keep them working smoothly. The fishing tackle used for kayak fishing tends to get banged around and dunked in the water a bit more frequently, so at least once a year, I take the fishing reels apart, clean them up and re-lube them with waterproof silicone grease. That’s enough to keep them working smoothly for an entire season of fishing.

Cleaning and re-lubing the fishing reels

First up are the reels we use for smallmouth bass and trout; a few light spinning reels and a baitcaster or two. Taking care of fishing reels is pretty straightforward and easy to do. All you do is take them apart, making sure you pay attention to how the parts fit so you can put it back together, clean them with alcohol so you don’t damage plastic parts, re-grease them(I use Slickoleum, a lightweight, waterproof, silicone grease) and put them back together. If you do it correctly, you shouldn’t have any parts left over and the reel will work just as good as when it was new.

In a week or so, we’ll be getting the kayak out of the garage and checking it out to make sure it is ready to go. We have to fix a crack on the deck and a few scratches on the hull along with the usual pre-season kayak checkup, so stay tuned for that.

Work is still continuing on the watermanatwork.com mobile website. We have a lot of it done but it’s a time consuming process, but it won’t be long before the website will work flawlessly on any digital device.

Mar 042015
 

Steve from Amphibian USA has sent us some his Spex Amphibious eyewear. A hybrid of sunglasses and goggles, these action sports oriented glasses look perfect for active watersports like kayaking, rafting, SUP, sailboarding and kiteboarding.

Amphibian USA Spex eyewear

The frames are soft and comfortable on your face and are held in place by an adjustable, replaceable neoprene strap and come in a variety of colors. The easily interchangeable and replaceable lenses come in a number of tints as well as clear. There are polarized lenses which are perfect for water oriented sports. The lenses are optically correct, block 100% of UVA and UVB light and are scratch resistant. If you wear contact lenses, Spex eyewear will keep water and dirt out of your eyes. The glasses float, which is a big plus, especially if you’ve ever lost a pair of $100 designer glasses over the side.

We are looking forward to using these glasses as soon as we get back out in the kayak. The way the weather has been going here in the PacNW, that shouldn’t be too long. Check out the different Spex colors and lenses and get ready for another season on the water.

Feb 212015
 

It’s the middle of winter here and the excitement level is not exactly at a fever pitch right now but things are happening. If you are a regular visitor to this blog or the watermanatwork.com website, you know that there are a lot of photos and videos and not a lot of text. Unfortunately, the big photos and video do not work well with four inch mobile phones, so we are designing the watermanatwork.com website to work perfectly on mobile devices. This takes a lot of mind-numbing computer coding where a single character out of place causes big problems, so it’s taking a little time.

watermanatwork.com mobile website

Not much going on here this time of year; the weather is usually rain and 40°F and there’s not much snow in the mountains, so we are parked in front of the computer working on the new mobile website. Once we get the new mobile website finished, we can get back to the photos and videos that need to be edited and uploaded. Even if it seems like nothing is happening, there is, it just takes a little time before you can see the results.

Feb 042015
 

Since fishing kayaks are fairly expensive, you may want to know how long a kayak is going to last. Even if you don’t keep the kayak yourself for five or ten years, it’s important to know how durable a kayak is as far as resale value goes if you choose to sell it.

When I got my Hobie Quest fishing kayak in 2005, I had already been kayak fishing for a few years so I knew what I wanted in a kayak. I started fishing out of the Quest on the Pacific Ocean and later, on the rivers and lakes of the Pacific Northwest. When conditions permitted, I would go kayak fishing whenever I could, often two or three times a week. When I go fishing, whether the fish are biting or not, I like to fish all day; on the water before sunrise and in as it gets dark, so the kayak has seen more than average use. I like to find the not easily accessed and more remote areas, so it’s only a small part of the time where I am launching from a ramp or beach.

Click HERE for the Hobie Quest review after ten years of fishing

We did a video review of how the Hobie Quest has held up under ten years of solid fishing use in some of the more rugged conditions a kayak fisherman is likely to find. Click HERE or on the photo above to check out the video.

The watermanatwork.com editing team is hard at work and there will be more videos up on the website shortly, so keep checking in.

Jan 182015
 

It looks like the maintenance on our servers is complete and we are back in business. Seems a little slow to me, but hopefully they will get things dialed in.

Thanks for your patience.

Jan 132015
 

The watermanatwork.com website servers will be down for maintenance on January 17, 2014 at 6:00PM PST. This maintenance will take about twelve hours and both the watermanatwork.com website and this blog will be offline.

Sorry for the downtime, but you know, computers.

Jan 082015
 

Have you ever said to yourself; “Gee, I sure wish I knew an easy and inexpensive way to cure salmon eggs”? Well, it’s your lucky day! We have just uploaded step by step instructions on how to cure salmon eggs. You’ll find out how to cure salmon eggs using the time tested “3-2-1 Cure”; a simple and effective egg cure used by generations of Pacfic Northwest salmon fishermen. Click HERE or on the photo below to go to the Curing Salmon Eggs web page.

Click HERE to go to the Curing Salmon Eggs web page

If you don’t want to read the easy directions and look at the photos on the web page, there is also a Curing Salmon Eggs video.

Stay tuned for more good stuff from WatermanAtWork!

Dec 312014
 

All of us here at WatermanAtWork want to wish everyone a happy and healthy 2015. 2014 was a great year on the water and in the woods here in the Pacific Northwest, we are hoping for more of the same in 2015.

Happy New Year!!!

Dec 252014
 

Just to prove that anything and everything can be controversial in today’s world, Japanese artist Megumi Igarashi has been arrested for distributing 3D printer files of her “vagina kayak”.

Artist Megumi Igarashi's controversial vagina kayak

Human genitalia are taboo subjects in Japanese society, but Igarashi has taken it upon herself to change that. Why she picked a kayak to do that is something only she knows. One thing for sure, this has got to be the most unusual and unexpected ways of using a poor, unsuspecting kayak.

What’s next?